Resume

Your resume is different than your application and essay. A resume highlights your work experience, activities, clubs, and awards by summarizing your accomplishments and involvement into one document. This is how colleges get an idea of the activities you are involved in. Brainstorm all of the activities you have committed yourself to – this is the time to brag. It is important for your resume to look professional. Click here to view sample resumes that have strong content and look. Begin building your resume –click here to view some templates you can use to get started. Check out Stanford Student Affairs and Big Future for resume writing tips. For “before and after” examples of resumes demonstrating common resume writing mistakes, click here.

Here are some of the things you resume should include:

  • Jobs Server, cashier, salesperson, or another service industry position, babysitting, tutoring, work done for family members and friends (mowing the lawn, painting a house) and any internship experiences you may have had – paid or unpaid!
  • Activities Participation in a club, athletics, volunteer/community service work, playing a musical instrument, appearing in a school production, church work, Out Of School time activities, Summer Work Ready programs, leadership organizations (Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts).
  • Awards and Accolades National Honor Society, academic achievement awards, perfect attendance certificates, any award or recognition from a teacher or principal, scholarships won, leadership camps/institutes invited to, college prep programs.

Resume Tips

Do

  • Use action verbs when listing your experience
  • Be consistent in your use of tenses (past vs. present tense) Use present tense for anything you are still involved with/regularly do. Use past tense for anything you no longer participate in. 
  • Be specific about what you accomplished
  • Start with the most important activities and skills, and end with the least

Don’t

  • Use flowery words or run-on sentences. Stick to the point.
  • Write a longer resume because you think it tells more about you. Stick to a one page resume that highlights your most important activities and skills.
  • Be casual or unprofessional. Make sure to use a plain font and keep style (bolding, bullets) simple.
  • Have typos or mistakes.Proofread carefully and have a parent or teacher look it over too.